Call for Entries: Science Photography Call for Entries: Science Photography – SOMETHING ABOUT SCIENCE

Call for Entries: Science Photography

© Ted Kinsman, Over-Inflating a Balloon 2011

© Ted Kinsman, Over-Inflating a Balloon 2011

The Royal Photography Society is seeking the world’s best scientific and engineering images. The photo competition, International Images for Science 2015, is open to photographers from all walks of life: scientists, engineers, students, and the public. If you have science photos that will awe the world, this is a chance to showcase your work.

The Society is looking for scientific images from engineering and all fields – the A to Z – of science (from Astronomy to Zoology). Also, the competition is open to all ages and divided into three categories: ages 17 and under, 18-25, and 26 and over.

A panel of scientists, photographers, and imaging experts will decide on 100 finalists. The selected images will be displayed in a touring exhibition launching at the British Science Festival in Bradford this September.

Entry is free. What’s more, there are prizes for winners. Visit the Society’s website for detail and to enter the competition. Entries are open until March 23rd, 2015 (midnight GMT).

“The images will illustrate how photography can inform and aid discovery in science and engineering,” says the Royal Photography Society. To get a feel for what they are looking for, check out these amazing photos from the past exhibition:

© Robert Gendler, Trifid Nebula : 1997-2002 About the image: Clouds of gas and dust mingle in a star-forming region known as the Trifid Nebula. The three dark arms that give the nebula its name almost hide our view of the massive star at the centre, the light from which has carved out this spherical hollow in the surrounding material and make it glow. The nebula, catalogued by astronomers as Messier 20 or NGC 6514, spans about ten light years in this frame. It is located about 9000 light years away in the constellation Sagittarius. This image was assembled by the photographer from various components: luminance data from the 8.2 metre Subaru telescope in Hawai’i, detail from the orbiting 2.4 metre Hubble Space Telescope and colour data by amateur astronomer Martin Pugh. Robert Gendler Astronomy, Avon, Connecticut, USA.

© Robert Gendler, Trifid Nebula : 1997-2002
Clouds of gas and dust mingle in a star-forming region known as the Trifid Nebula. The three dark arms that give the nebula its name almost hide our view of the massive star at the centre, the light from which has carved out this spherical hollow in the surrounding material and make it glow. The nebula, catalogued by astronomers as Messier 20 or NGC 6514, spans about ten light years in this frame. It is located about 9000 light years away in the constellation Sagittarius. This image was assembled by the photographer from various components: luminance data from the 8.2 metre Subaru telescope in Hawai’i, detail from the orbiting 2.4 metre Hubble Space Telescope and colour data by amateur astronomer Martin Pugh.

© Nicole Ottawa, Beauveria Bassiana 2012 About the image: "Coloured scanning electron micrograph showing the base of the antenna of a mosquito. The thin white tendrils are a fungus, Beauveria bassiana. This is common to many soils and is parasitic on many insects, causing white muscardine disease. B. bassiana is already used as a biological pesticide to control many types of insect pests, such as termites, aphids and some beetles. More recently it has been studied as a possible biological control for malaria-transmitting mosquitoes. This image was created in monochrome and later digitally colourised. Eye of Science, Reutlingen, Germany."

© Nicole Ottawa, Beauveria Bassiana 2012
Coloured scanning electron micrograph showing the base of the antenna of a mosquito. The thin white tendrils are a fungus, Beauveria bassiana. This is common to many soils and is parasitic on many insects, causing white muscardine disease. B. bassiana is already used as a biological pesticide to control many types of insect pests, such as termites, aphids and some beetles. More recently it has been studied as a possible biological control for malaria-transmitting mosquitoes. This image was created in monochrome and later digitally colourised.

© Ted Kinsman, Over-Inflating a Balloon 2011 About the image: "High-speed flash image showing a balloon shortly after it has burst. A few millilitres of water were put in the balloon before it was inflated. When it burst, the sudden drop in pressure allowed water vapour inside to cool rapidly, forming the water droplets seen here. The flash was triggered by the sound of the balloon bursting, its duration of 50 microseconds freezing the moment."

© Ted Kinsman, Over-Inflating a Balloon 2011
High-speed flash image showing a balloon shortly after it has burst. A few millilitres of water were put in the balloon before it was inflated. When it burst, the sudden drop in pressure allowed water vapour inside to cool rapidly, forming the water droplets seen here. The flash was triggered by the sound of the balloon bursting, its duration of 50 microseconds freezing the moment.

© Hugh Turvey, Women Drinking Water 2010 A variety of imaging techniques is used here to visually illustrate the anatomy and mechanics of a simple yet essential action – drinking water. The image uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray and conventional photographic elements that have been digitally combined and given a blue tint.

© Hugh Turvey, Women Drinking Water 2010
A variety of imaging techniques is used here to visually illustrate the anatomy and mechanics of a simple yet essential action – drinking water. The image uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray and conventional photographic elements that have been digitally combined and given a blue tint.

Even if you won’t be entering the competition, it would be worthwhile to come back later and check out the sensational, winning photos. (I know I will!)

Not feeling inspired or need more time? You might still have a chance to enter next year. The Society says the exhibition is to become an annual event for the next three years.

Here is a profile of the Society, from their press release:

The Royal Photographic Society is an educational charity. It was founded in 1853 ‘to promote the Art and Science of photography’ and was granted the use of the title ‘Royal’ in 1894 and it’s Royal Charter in 2004. With a membership open to everyone The Society is the UK’s largest organisation representing photographers with over 11,100 members in the UK and abroad. The Society publishes the Photographic Journal and Imaging Science Journal and it holds over 300 events around the UK and abroad. Its world-class Collection of historic photographs, equipment and library is housed for nation at the National Media Museum, Bradford.

Lynn Kimlicka

I am a scientist-turned writer and editor, who loves to read and write (more than doing experiments). I have a PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology, with a specialization in structural biology. My interests range widely, from life sciences to pop culture and arts to music. I am bilingual in English and Japanese.

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