A giant squid — Caught on video for the first time A giant squid — Caught on video for the first time – SOMETHING ABOUT SCIENCE

A giant squid — Caught on video for the first time

140 years after a giant squid attacked the submarine Nautilus in Jules Verne’s masterpiece, the formidable creature has finally been caught in the act.

A giant squid in its deep-sea habitat was captured on camera for the first time ever, thanks to the efforts of the joint expedition consisting of scientists led by a Japanese zoologist, Japanese filmmakers and broadcaster, and the Discovery Channel.

A close-up image of a giant squid in the deep ocean.

A close-up image of a giant squid in the deep ocean.

After the first photographs of the giant squid in the deep water appeared in 2004, obtaining video footages of the creature in its habitat had remained a challenge. The mission took the team 100 dives and 400 hours of recordings to succeed. The video was taken last summer (July 2012) in the Pacific Ocean – 1000 kilometers (600 miles) south of Tokyo, at the breath-taking depth of up to 900 meters (2950 feet).

The squid caught on the camera measured 3 meters (9 feet) long, which is still relatively small for its kind.

The video capturing in the deep ocean was made possible by the use of ultrasensitive camera that uses infrared light.

The Japanese broadcaster, NHK aired the footage on January 13th. The Discovery Channel will air it on January 27th, but in the meantime, you can take a sneak peek of the footage on the ABC News at the Youtube link above.

Happy squid watching! 🙂

References:
Giant Squid Filmed in Ocean Depths for 1st Time
Denizen of the Deep, Caught on Film

Lynn Kimlicka

I am a scientist-turned writer and editor, who loves to read and write (more than doing experiments). I have a PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology, with a specialization in structural biology. My interests range widely, from life sciences to pop culture and arts to music. I am bilingual in English and Japanese.

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